emergingfree

Christian and Socially-Conscious…One Woman's Expression

Archive for the tag “responsibility”

Field Work

Societal ills are easy to spot, aren’t they?  From problems in education to failures in addressing mental health concerns;  From homelessness to hungriness, unemployment to under-employment—you name the category and within it will reside a laundry list of shortcomings waiting to be addressed.  It can be overwhelming, especially if you sincerely care for the wellbeing of others.

He told them, “The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few.  Ask the Lord of the harvest, therefore, to send out workers into his harvest field.  —Luke 10:2

There was a time in my life when I had worked myself into utter exhaustion under the guise of community service…or dare I say, Christian service.  I was so tired emotionally, mentally, physically, and spiritually that I needed to put myself in a timeout.  Yes, I needed to go and sit in a corner, facing a wall and think about what got me here.  I needed to find a place where I was not being distracted by the work that needed to be done because I had just enough confidence to think, “I can do it.”  I needed to settle and center myself so that I could hear God’s voice.

Rest

Yes, within me He has stirred a genuine love for people.  Yes, within me He has placed a sizable amount of assurance.  During this time, however, He was developing within me a deeper understanding of what and with whom I am to work.  I, also, needed to be clear about where within His field He assigned me to work.

Prior to my timeout session, I would do things because I could.  If there was a problem and if I could help, I would.  An interesting thing happened, however, once I became depleted.  I prayed often and unapologetically for strength, clarity, and help.

Admittedly, it felt good being revitalized—so good, in fact, I needed to be reminded to get back in the field.  Just like I had learned to pray for help, others were praying for me to helpHave you ever showed up at a place and knew that somebody prayed for you to be there?  You may not know who prayed (—and they may not know that it was you who they prayed for—), but you knew somebody did.  Such knowledge confirms responsibility.

As a Christian, I understand that there is work to do.  I understand that I am a servant, a worker.  (Faith without works is dead. —Read James)  I understand that the Body needs all of its parts to function most efficiently and effectively.  It is my constant prayer for workers, for help, for Family to join me in God’s harvest field where there is much work to do.  We may not work in the same area, but looking across the valleys and plains, seeing and knowing that you are too working, not only makes things easier for me, but it also encourages my soul.  I can only hope that when you look over at me the feeling is mutual.  Pray.

A Generation’s Responsibility

In my profession, it is not uncommon for me to know someone whose parent is an attorney or a judge.  This may be the same for you, or maybe you know of  similar situations.  Do you know someone in the military whose mother or father was in the military?  Maybe you know someone who is a teacher whose parent taught; or maybe a police officer whose parent was also; or a pastor, or a doctor, or a business owner?  Surely, you can name an entertainer whose child is an entertainer.  Many times children follow in the footsteps of their parents, good or otherwise.

For a long time, I looked at this passing of the baton from the standpoint of struggle.  This made sense for someone like me.  You see, I could easily see the number of obstacles in place to halt me as I pursued dreams not of my family’s business.  I did not have a relative (or family friend) introducing me to this person and to that person for professional advancement.  I had limited opportunities to overhear conversations for avoiding certain workplace pitfalls.  They were limited because you can only be proactive when you are aware of the potential hindrance.  As you know, life can be challenging.  Now, add the additional component of discovering the ropes without a tangible roadmap.  There are real trials and frustrations when you are the first to….do…..anything.  With no mentor, how can you not see struggle?  How could I not see it?

This morning, however, my viewpoint expanded.  As I was sliding on my business jacket, a series of images came to mind: businesses, land, and sacrifice.  I began to think about my ancestors and about the property they owned, the structures they built, the obstacles they overcame to make life better for those of us who have come afterwards.  Driving to work, I thought about the times in which they lived.  My thoughts grew to include the ancestors of others.  I began to think in general terms.  I wondered if our ancestors would weep or rejoice.  It was then that I understood, on a deeper level, that every generation has a responsibility.

Before this morning, I thought that every person has a responsibility to make things better for the next generation.  This is true, but it is finite.  Better, after all, is subjective to an individual’s moral and ethical beliefs.  It is also confined to one’s ration for another.  Now, I am aware that this responsibility is bigger than one person if we truly want to leave a viable legacy for those in succession.

Who wants the best of the best; the cream of the crop; the pick of the litter?

I DO!  I want it for me and for you.

“But how can we both have it,” I heard someone ask.

How can we both not?

Expand your mind to grasp the notion that we are all living at this time.  We are a generation, living.  Epidemics kill because we are connected.  Blessing multiply because we are connected.

Individually, we are each a part of a larger whole.  Our responsibility as individuals, as with our ancestors, is now and will be bigger than our sole selves.  Our ancestors understood this, many giving their lives for this truth.  Many cultures understand this, many passing down belief systems that emphasize its importance.  So here, today, I wonder……how many of us get it.

Mother-Daughter

Post Navigation